Some of the things I have learned from attending the “Database as a service – Enterprise Cloud in three simple steps” session this morning at Oracle Open World

Some of the things I have learned from attending the “Database as a service – Enterprise Cloud in three simple steps” session this morning at Oracle Open World:

Both presenters Adeesh Fulay and Matthew McKerley did a very good job explaining things.

Traditional Database deployments DBaaS (Database as a Service)
Configuration of Hardware Request Database deployment via the Cloud
Configuration of Middleware Adjust capacity on demand
Configuration of Database Deploy Applications via the Cloud
Configuration of Application

Self Service

  • Pre-packaged
  • One click provisioning
  • On demand scaling
  • Metering – Chargeback
  • Comparable with Amazon Cloud Services

Metering / Chargeback

  • Charge reports for Cost Centers
  • Rollup based on LDAP hierarchy

Creating a Cloud

  • Automated discovery and resource base-lining
  • Consolidation Planning
    • Eliminates inefficient use of resources
    • Cloud models on Virtualized and Physical platforms

Something on Hiearchy

  • Cloud – Top-level entity
    • Database zones – Defines a logical unit based on configuration, version etc.
      • Database software – Oracle Home
        • RAC Cluster – Collection of Servers with Clusterware installed

Cloud Administrator

  • Provision
  • Manage Cloud Resources
  • Create Users and Roles
  • Manage Security and Policies
  • Provision Database Software

Self Service Administrator

  • Define deployment procedures for database provisioning
  • Define services in Service Catalog for deployment by Self Service users
  • Assign quotas to Users and Roles
  • Define access boundaries (map Roles to Zones)

Database Provisioning Procedures

  • Usage of Provisioning Profiles
  • Ability to lock down certain Configuration Parameters
  • Catalog of Service Templates – saved Deployment Procedures

Creation of database zones

  • Policy constraints per Host
    • Max CPU utilization
    • Max MEM
    • Max number of database instances
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s